Resolution TOP

From TouchDesigner 088 Wiki

ResolutionTOP 11.jpg

Summary

The Resolution TOP changes the resolution of the TOP image. This can also be done on the Common page of most other TOPs.

PythonIcon.png resolutionTOP_Class

Parameters - Resolution Page

High Quality Resize - Uses weighted averages of multiple-pixels when scaling down the image.

Parameters - Common Page

Resolution - quickly change the resolution of the TOP's data.

  • Input - uses the input's resolution.
  • Eighth, Quarter, Half, 2X, 4X, 8X - multiply the input's resolution by that amount.
  • Custom Resolution - enables the Custom Res parameter below, giving direct control over resolution width and height.

Custom Res - enabled only when the Resolution parameter is set to Custom Resolution. Some Generators like Constant and Ramp do not use inputs and only use this field to determine their size. The drop down menu on the right provides some commonly used base-2 resolutions.

Use Global Resolution Multiplier - Uses the Global Resolution Multiplier found in Edit>Preferences>TOPs. This multiplies all the TOP resolutions by the set amount. This is handy when working on computers with different hardware specifications. If a project is designed on a desktop workstation with lots of graphics memory, a user on a laptop with only 64MB VRAM can set the Global Resolution Multiplier to a value of half or quarter so it runs at an acceptable speed. By checking this checkbox on, this TOP is affected by the global multiplier.

Aspect Ratio - sets the image aspect ratio allowing any textures to be viewed in any size. Watch for unexpected results when compositing TOPs with different aspect ratios.

  • Input - uses the input's aspect ratio.
  • Resolution - uses the aspect of the image's defined resolution (ie 512x256 would be 2:1), whereby each pixel is square.
  • Custom Aspect Ratio - lets you explicitly define a custom aspect ratio.

Input Smoothness - This controls pixel filtering on the input image of the TOP.

  • Interpolate Pixels - uses linear filtering between pixels. This is how you get TOP images in viewers to look good at various zoom levels, especially useful when using any Fill Viewer setting other than Native Resolution.
  • Nearest Pixel - uses nearest pixel or accurate image representation. Images will look jaggy when viewing at any zoom level other than Native Resolution.

Fill Viewer - determine how the TOP image is displayed in the viewer.

  • Input - uses the same Fill Viewer settings as its input.
  • Fill - stretches the image to fit the edges of the viewer.
  • Fit Horizontal - stretches image to fit viewer horizontally.
  • Fit Vertical - stretches image to fit viewer vertically.
  • Fit Best - stretches or squashes image so no part of image is cropped.
  • Fit Worst - stretches or squashes image so image fills viewer while constraining its proportions. This often leads to part of image getting cropped by viewer.
  • *** Native Resolution - displays the native resolution of the image in the viewer.

NOTE: To get an understanding of how TOPs works with images, you will want to set this to Native Resolution as you lay down TOPs when starting out. This will let you see what is actually happening without any automatic viewer resizing.

Viewer Smoothness - This controls pixel filtering in the viewers.

  • Interpolate Pixels - uses linear filtering between pixels. Use this to get TOP images in viewers to look good at various zoom levels, especially useful when using any Fill Viewer setting other than Native Resolution.
  • Nearest Pixel - uses nearest pixel or accurate image representation. Images will look jaggy when viewing at any zoom level other than Native Resolution.

Passes - duplicates the operation of the TOP the specified number of times.

Channel Mask - Allows you to choose which channels (R, G, B, or A) the TOP will operate on. All channels are selected by default.

Generate Mipmaps - Generates mipmaps for the TOPs texture. This minimizes sparkles and artifacts in the textures when zooming in and out.

Pixel Format - format used to store data for each channel in the image (ie. R, G, B, and A)

  • Input - uses the input's pixel format.
  • 8-bit - uses 8-bit integer values for each channel.
  • 16-bit float - uses 16-bit float values for each channel.
  • 32-bit float - uses 32-bit float values for each channel. There is no linear filtering when using this format.

Re-use Input's Memory -

Notes

The 8-bit pixel format is the native format of video cards (these numbers
are the # of bits per channel). 16 and 32 bit will be slower then 8-bit.
With 32-bit all filtering is turned off so the images will look quite a bit
more pixely and will swim a lot if mapped to geometry. The main use for the
32-bit format is for vertex texture fetches in vertex shaders (this is the
only format you can do vertex texture fetches with).

The resolution TOP is there more for usability then speed. You'll notice the
parameters in the resolution TOP are the exact same parameters that every
TOP has in their Common page. If you want maximum efficiency just change the
resolution in the other TOPs and avoid the resolution TOP all together.